It’s summer and we’re feeling generous, so with thought we’d share this month’s Nomad Devotional with everyone. If you’re a patron of nomad you’ll be very familiar with our Devotionals. Each month we ask a guest to offer us a reflection. And then we unpack it with music, song and readings.
This month we asked the former Dean of Duke Divinity School Elaine Heath to reflect on the spiritual practices she sees as vital for Christians today, and the spiritual practice that has had a particularly deep impact in her own life. David Blower then responds with music and a couple of new songs.
If you want more resources like these, and opportunities to connect with the nomad community, then check out our Patreon page.


Image provided by Duke Divinity School. Used with permission.

If you want more from Elaine, then check out her many wonderful books. And our 2014 interview with her…

This months Devotional explores the title found in Psalm 145 “God of All Flesh” – God as the loving Maker of all, across tribal, religious or ethnic boundaries, or boundaries of purity and taboo. Dave Andrews reflects on his work alongside Muslims and his conviction that Jesus has no religious gatekeepers.

With the help of Old Testament theologian Walter Brueggemann, this month’s devotional explores the themes of “friendship,” “knowing” and “abiding”… What is the language of friendship with God really about? How do friendship with God and friendship with neighbour intersect? How are they kept together?

Poet and priest Malcolm Guite helps us mark the death and resurrection of Jesus with poems from his series on the stations of the cross, and with his reflections on the Messianic Event. Nomad’s David Blower responds to Malcolm’s poetry and thought in sound and song, and Kate Blower brings the Easter readings.


Image provided by Malcolm Guite. Used with permission.

The poems Malcolm used in this devotional can be found in his book Sounding the Seasons.

 

We produce devotionals like this every month as bonus content for our supporters. So if you’re interested in helping us pay the bills, head over to our Patreon page, where you’ll also be able to access Nomad Book Club and our online community The Beloved Listener Lounge, and you’ll be able to get your hands on a beloved listener mug!

This devotional welcomes in the new year with Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s poem New Years Day, which is here set to song. The poem, alongside others, can be read in Letters and Papers from Prison. The song For Thy Mercy is adapted from the hymn by Henry Downton. With reflections from Ruth Nash and readings from Hannah Nash.

Here’s the final part of our four-part Advent Devotional series. This time philosopher and theologian Elaine Storkey reflects on Advent in the context of those on the margins. Former Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams finishes the Advent readings, and David Benjamin Blower closes things out with his unique style of music and songs.


Images provided by SPCK and Magdalene College. Used with permission.

If you’d like more Devotionals from Nomad, then simply head over to Patreon, where a small monthly donation will give you access to a monthly devotional, and so much more!

And if it’s more Advent reflections you’re after, then remember you can still access the Christmas and Advent reflections we asked some of our favourite Nomad guests to send to us over the last few years, including Shane Claiborne, Greg Boyd, Nadia Bolz Weber, Krista Tippett, Phyllis Tickle and many others [warning: there’s a lot less music and a lot more tomfoolery in these earlier reflections!].

It’s week three of our four-part Advent Devotional series. This time philosopher and theologian Elaine Storkey considers how Advent might be Good News to the Poor. Former Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams continues to work his way through the Advent readings, with the help of Kate Blower. And David Benjamin Blower continues to bring the music and songs. So good!


Images provided by SPCK and Magdalene College. Used with permission.

If you’d like more Devotionals from Nomad, then simply head over to Patreon, where a small monthly donation will give you access to a monthly devotional, and so much more!

And if it’s more Advent reflections you’re after, then remember you can still access the Christmas and Advent reflections we asked some of our favourite Nomad guests to send to us over the last few years, including Shane Claiborne, Greg Boyd, Nadia Bolz Weber, Krista Tippett, Phyllis Tickle and many others [warning: there’s a lot less music and a lot more tomfoolery in these earlier reflections!].

Here’s the second part of our four-part Advent Devotional series. This time philosopher and theologian Elaine Storkey bases her reflection around the idea of Peace Across Borders. Former Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams again brings the readings along with Kate Blower, and David Benjamin Blower brings the music and songs.


Images provided by SPCK and Magdalene College. Used with permission.

If you’d like more Devotionals from Nomad, then simply head over to Patreon, where a small monthly donation will give you access to a monthly devotional, and so much more!

And if it’s more Advent reflections you’re after, then remember you can still access the Christmas and Advent reflections we asked some of our favourite Nomad guests to send to us over the last few years, including Shane Claiborne, Greg Boyd, Nadia Bolz Weber, Krista Tippett, Phyllis Tickle and many others [warning: there’s a lot less music and a lot more tomfoolery in these earlier reflections!].

 

If you’re one of our Patreon supporters, then you’ll already be familiar with our Nomad Devotionals. Every month we ask a guest to reflect on a topic, and then we unpack it with music, song, readings, and prayers.

For Advent we thought we produce a four-part Devotional and make it available to everyone. So for the next four Sundays you can expect a reflection from philosopher and theologian Elaine Storkey, and the former archbishop of Canterbury, Dr. Rowan Williams will be contributing the readings, along with Kate Blower who will be reading the magnificat in the first Devotional. And of course Nomad’s David Benjamin Blower will be bringing the music and songs. What more could you ask for this Christmas?!

This first devotional reflects on the idea of liberation.


Images provided by SPCK and Magdalene College. Used with permission.

If you’d like more Devotionals from Nomad, then simply head over to Patreon, where a small monthly donation will give you access to a monthly devotional, and so much more!

And if it’s more Advent reflections you’re after, then remember you can still access the Christmas and Advent reflections we asked some of our favourite Nomad guests to send to us over the last few years, including Shane Claiborne, Greg Boyd, Nadia Bolz Weber, Krista Tippett, Phyllis Tickle and many others [warning: there’s a lot less music and a lot more tomfoolery in these earlier reflections!].

 

In many ways, Nomad has been quite an intellectual journey. And as much as we love some good old fashioned theological cut-and-thrust, we’ve increasingly aware that if this journey is going to be sustainable, it’s got to be an holistic one. So each month we’ll be producing Nomad Devotionals, through which we’ll be experimenting with readings, prayers, liturgies and songs. We’re making the first one free to everyone, so you can decide whether you’re interested in joining us on this leg of the journey. If you are, then head over to Patreon and donate $5 or more a month to gain access to future Devotionals (as well as bonus interviews and post-interview reflections).
Make sure you let us know what you think of this and future Devotionals on the Patreon Forum, as like everything Nomad does, your input will shape this shared journey.


Image used with permission.

This first devotional was made with help from: Rabbi Margaret Jacobi from Birmingham’s Progressive Synagogue; theologian and urban gardener Sam Ewell; and Brian McLaren, who kindly gives the benediction. The song Hallelujah Sing Exulting was adapted from an old hymn by Martin Gensichen (1879-1965). All other music is by David Benjamin Blower (all rights reserved, and all that). The song Come Holy Spirit is Public Domain (as is Hallelujah Sing Exulting), so please help yourself.


If this devotional has whetted you appetite, then you’re in luck as there’s plenty more to come. In the mean time, check out David’s back catalogue on bandcamp. I would particularly encourage you to get yourself a copy of Welcome the Stranger, and The Book of Jonah, and the accompanying book Sympathy for Jonah.